school boy

NZ Initiative finds most schools have about the same impact on students' results

Dr Oliver Hartwich speaks to Guyon Espiner about our latest research, Tomorrow's Schools: Data and Evidence. This report comes at the end of a comprehensive, year-long data analysis of 400,000 students and shows that once family background is separated out, most schools have about the same impact on their students' learning - no matter their decile. Read more

Dr Oliver Hartwich
Radio New Zealand - Morning Report
8 April, 2019
apple on book1

School quality is not linked to school decile - NZ Initiative

Following the release of our Research Note, Tomorrow's School: Data and Evidence, our Chief Economist Dr Eric Crampton chats to Newstalk ZB's Heather du Plessis-Allan about our comprehensive and year-long econometric analysis of data for 400,000 students that reveals there are no significant differences in school performance between schools of different deciles, and how this data could be used by the Ministry of Education to help improve education outcomes for New Zealand students. Read more

8 April, 2019
Research note Tomorrows Schools Data and Evidence cover5

Research note: Tomorrow’s Schools: Data and evidence

A comprehensive and year-long econometric analysis of data for 400,000 students undertaken by The New Zealand Initiative reveals there are no significant differences in school performance between schools of different deciles. Adjusted for the different student populations they serve, the vast majority of New Zealand’s secondary schools create the education outcomes we would expect from them. This finding calls into question the assertion of the Tomorrow’s Schools Independent Taskforce, led by Bali Haque, which claimed that “quality of our schools... Read more

Joel Hernandez
8 April, 2019
Tomorrows Schools

Hubs raise unanswered questions

The question of how to help schools face challenging circumstances was a key focus of Monday’s Tomorrow’s Schools review discussion held jointly by the Initiative and Victoria University’s Faculty of Education. The Tomorrow’s Schools Taskforce is clear, and the Initiative agrees, that there is a serious and stubborn problem of underachievement among students from certain ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. According to the taskforce, one of the key causes of this inequity in outcomes is the way we organise our education... Read more

Briar Lipson
Insights Newsletter
5 April, 2019
Budget 2021

The value of everything

Oscar Wilde once quipped that a cynic was “a man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing”. That saying has since migrated to refer to economists. Allegedly, our depraved profession values only money. But for our widespread incompetence we would all be rich. In fact, deep down economics is about value, not cash. Economists do not loaf around in universities and government agencies to get rich. Read more

Dr Bryce Wilkinson
Insights Newsletter
5 April, 2019
Remote control

A beautiful broadcasting anachronism

For those of us of a certain age, part of the thrill of staying up late as a kid was getting to see and hear things on television that did not air during afternoon cartoons. Before 9pm, one set of rules applied. After 9pm was the so-called ‘watershed’, well, things were different – especially on the French version of Canada’s public broadcaster. None of the words you’d hear on late-night television were new, but there was still a thrill to... Read more

Dr Eric Crampton
Insights Newsletter
5 April, 2019
Chatham

Chatham housing

When Housing Minister Phil Twyford spoke at the Initiative’s retreat last week, I had only one regret about having invited him: Our event is held under Chatham House rules.You see, under Chatham House rules you cannot report or attribute anything that is said at the conference. This is to facilitate a free exchange of views and ideas.It was a pity because the Minister’s speech was the best political statement on urban development I ever heard. Read more

Dr Oliver Hartwich
Insights Newsletter
29 March, 2019
Solar

If you want to cut emissions, make polluters pay

When governments want to reduce emissions, they have a choice between using policy or price. Policy includes rules – for example, 100% of electricity must be generated from renewables – as well as incentive payments, such as electric vehicle subsidies. Alternatively, governments can price carbon using cap-and-trade, or tax carbon directly. The fact that emissions occur in millions of places in the economy strongly affects the relative performance of policy and price. Read more

Matt Burgess
Insights Newsletter
29 March, 2019
Bus

In praise of perpetuating role confusion

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester says NZ Bus is up to 40 drivers short, with up to 30 cancelled services a day. He now wants the Transport Minister to help improve local bus services. Local National List MP Nicola Willis also wants central government to step in. A sceptic might ask what that means for local government accountability to the local community. The answer is of course that it perpetuates the status quo – inglorious role confusion. Read more

Dr Bryce Wilkinson
Insights Newsletter
29 March, 2019

Media release - New report: Pricing carbon properly key to successful renewables policy

Wellington (28 March 2019): Ahead of the Interim Climate Change Committee’s recommendations to Government, think tank The New Zealand Initiative today released an economic assessment of the proposed transition to 100% renewable electricity by 2035. Authored by Research Fellow Matt Burgess, Switched on! finds that New Zealand is well-placed to increase the share of renewable electricity from its current level of 83%. However, the Initiative’s report warns that New Zealand must learn from costly policy failures overseas if we want... Read more

Media release
28 March, 2019
Cover Switched on2

Switched on! Achieving a green, affordable and reliable energy future

The coalition government has committed New Zealand to a goal of generating 100% of its electricity from renewable energy by 2035.Renewables already account for 83% of our electricity, and on current trends will generate up to 97% of our electricity in 2035 without any help from policy changes.However, as Matt Burgess shows in this report, the last 3% through to 100% renewables share will be tremendously expensive, and could raise greenhouse gas emissions.New Zealand’s electricity is secure, affordable and among... Read more

Matt Burgess
28 March, 2019

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