Final Roger Partridge2

Roger Partridge

Senior Fellow & Chairman

Roger Partridge is chairman and a co-founder of The New Zealand Initiative, and is a senior member of its research team. He led law firm Bell Gully as executive chairman from 2007 to 2014, after 16 years as a commercial litigation partner. Roger was executive director of the Legal Research Foundation, a charitable foundation associated with the University of Auckland, from 2001 to 2009, and was a member of the Council of the New Zealand Law Society, the governing body of the legal profession in New Zealand, from 2011 to 2015. He is a chartered member of the Institute of Directors, a member of the editorial board of the New Zealand Law Review and a member of the Mont Pelerin Society.

Latest report:
Submission: Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill  (2017)

Phone: +64 4 499 0790

Email: roger.partridge@nzinitiative.org.nz

Recent Work

school books

What's the difference between a lawyer and a teacher?

If this sounds like the beginning of a joke, that is because it is. Only it is not a very good one.Almost everyone would agree we have too many lawyers. Even some lawyers. Yet as the headlines have been telling us for a fortnight, teachers are in short supply.Indeed, according to some school principals, we have a crisis. And it seems the problem is worst in Auckland. Read more

Roger Partridge
The National Business Review
24 November, 2017
savings

Magical thinking doesn't lift wages

During the election campaign, newly sworn-in Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern named climate change as the challenge of her generation. If it is, lifting labour productivity is a close second.Productivity growth has been low over the past decade and a half. Therefore, growth in real wages has also been modest. If future generations are to share New Zealand’s enviable prosperity, that must change.The first response to this challenge from Ms Ardern’s government has been a promise to lift the minimum wage... Read more

Roger Partridge
The National Business Review
3 November, 2017
Vote

Who likes MMP now?

For those of us who think elections should be about policies and not about politics, MMP presents a special kind of purgatory.It is one day short of a fortnight since the election but are we any closer to knowing the result? And this despite Bill English’s National Party winning a higher share of the votes in the preliminary results than John Key achieved in 2008.Indeed, National under Mr English gained a higher share of the preliminary vote than any party... Read more

Roger Partridge
The National Business Review
6 October, 2017
Parliament

Blue and Green should never be seen. Or should they?

Once it was a colour combination frowned upon in the world of fashion (or so I am told). But apparently haute couture has moved on. Should our politicians do so too? Watching Bill English and James Shaw respond to questions this week on the possibility of a National/Greens coalition, it is plain neither is comfortable with the concept.Yet if our political parties – of whatever colour – were true to the MMP game, they would put old loyalties aside. Read more

Roger Partridge
Insights Newsletter
29 September, 2017
apple on book1

What is wrong with our regulatory institutions?

To get the right answers you have to ask the right questions. If you do not, chances are you will not discover everything you need to know. This precisely captures a problem with the terms of reference set for the Productivity Commission’s review of New Zealand’s regulatory regimes and regulatory institutions in 2014. The resulting report identified a litany of problems with our regulators. Some, it said, placed significant weight on managing risks to the organisation at the expense of... Read more

Roger Partridge
Insights Newsletter
1 September, 2017
NZcoins

Labour is back in the game, but does it have the right answers?

Two proposed taxes - on petrol and water - in her first week could have voters believing the new Leader of the Opposition has something against fluids. Any such fears, though, should have been relieved when Jacinda Ardern sent a tweet last week showing the contents of her liquor cabinet rival Winston Peters’. It was also a relief to hear one of the opposition parties talking about policies rather than personalities. And about policies that matter. Read more

Roger Partridge
Insights Newsletter
18 August, 2017
apple on book1

Are Labour's dogma days over?

In ancient Greek, a dogma was something that simply seemed to be true. Today, of course, it has a more absolute meaning. Fanatics of whatever flavour hold their core dogmas sacred. If they belong to a cult that believes the true path lies in cupcake consumption, then they will consume cupcakes. And they will accept their dogma without question.Under its former leader, there was more than a little of this in Labour’s opposition to partnership schools. Read more

Roger Partridge
The National Business Review
11 August, 2017
CreditsCards

Right and wrong in ComCom proposals

We all know two wrongs don’t make a right. But nor does getting something only half right. At least not when it is also half wrong.And that is precisely how we should view Commerce Minister Jacqui Dean’s announcement last week about proposed changes to the Commerce Act.She was right to rule out broadening s36 of the Commerce Act. But her proposal to grant the Commerce Commission powers to conduct proactive “market studies” is badly mistaken.Let’s start with s36. Read more

Roger Partridge
The National Business Review
7 July, 2017
Swiss cablecar

Unusual business in Switzerland

An unusual event took place among the leaders of New Zealand’s largest companies last week. Whether it was Air New Zealand’s Christopher Luxon, ASB Bank’s Barbara Chapman or delegation leader Fraser Whineray from Mercury, en masse they put aside their desk jobs to participate in The New Zealand Initiative’s week-long Go Swiss trip. Read more

Roger Partridge
The National Business Review
2 June, 2017
Brexit

Presentation: What an independent Britain can learn from New Zealand

What will Britain look like after Brexit? This is the dominant question in British politics right now. As the UK withdraws from the EU, it will regain independence over policy areas which were previously controlled by Brussels. Read more

Dr Oliver Hartwich
Roger Partridge
Presentation to The Adam Smith Institute
17 May, 2017

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